World’s most powerful wind turbine installed in Scotland

The turbine is the first of 11 to be deployed at the Vattenfall-owned facility in Aberdeen Bay and the developers say that the facility will now be able to produce the equivalent of more than 70% of Aberdeen’s domestic electricity demand and annually displace 134,128 tonnes of CO2.

The development had been held up due to a legal challenge from US President Donald Trump, who complained that the turbines would spoil the views of his nearby golf course.

The two turbines have each increased from 8.4MW to 8.8MW and the installation represents the first time an 8.8 MW model has been deployed commercially in the offshore wind industry. They have a tip of 191m, each blade is 80m long and the 164m rotor has a circumference larger than that of the London Eye’s.

EOWDC project director at Vattenfall, Adam Ezzamel, said: ‘The first turbine installation is a significant achievement and credit to the diligence and engineering know-how of the project team and contractors. For it to be one of the 8.8MW models makes it an even more momentous moment because it further endorses the EOWDC as a world-class hub of offshore wind innovation.

‘We are very excited by the cutting-edge technology deployed on all the turbines and it is remarkable that just one rotation of the blades can power the average UK home for a day.’

Sean Morrison, Chair of Aberdeen Renewable Energy Group (AREG), said: ‘The EOWDC is leading the way in terms of innovation for the offshore wind sector and will help enable the next generation of offshore wind.

‘It’s a real coup for the region to have the world’s most powerful turbines on its doorstep and cements Aberdeen’s position as a major global energy city. It also will lead us to a greener future.’

EOWDC project director at Vattenfall, Adam Ezzamel, said: ‘The first turbine installation is a significant achievement and credit to the diligence and engineering know-how of the project team and contractors.

‘For it to be one of the 8.8MW models makes it an even more momentous moment because it further endorses the EOWDC as a world-class hub of offshore wind innovation.

‘We are very excited by the cutting-edge technology deployed on all the turbines and it is remarkable that just one rotation of the blades can power the average UK home for a day.’

Thomas Barrett

Thomas Barrett

Thomas Barrett is the editor of Environment Journal. Follow him on Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Share This